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Kirk & Sweeney

Forseglingen på Kirk and Sweeney flaskerne gemmer på en lille finesse.
Korken er forseglet med et tyndt messingfarvet bånd med længde- og breddegraderne 40 ° 34 '57.62 "- 73 ° 19' 2.14".

Koordinaterne fører til Jones Beach, der i 1920´erne blev brugt når der blev smuglet rom til USA. En del af den smuglerrom der kom til USA fra Caribien, blev fragtet af båden Kirk and Sweeney.

Proppen holder stolt på flaskens indhold. Træk den op, og afslør et visuelt fingerpeg. På korken står der: "Kirk and Sweeney beslaglagt januar 1924."

KIRK AND SWEENEY was a wooden schooner, best known for smuggling rum from the Caribbean to the Northeast during the early years of Prohibition. In 1924, it was seized off the coast of New York with a massive amount of rum aboard.
The schooner was subsequently renamed “Chase” and pressed into duty as a Coast Guard trainer, serving until the late 1940’s when it was retired and salvaged.

LOOKING AT ITS DEEP AMBER AND IRIDESCENT COPPER COLOR, IT'S CLEAR THIS 23-YEAR-OLD RUM IS UNIQUELY CHARMING. ITS NOSE TEASES WITH TOASTY, DRIED FRUITS AND A HINT OF HONEY AND TOFFEE, WHILE THE TASTE DELIGHTS THROUGH AN EVOLVING SENSATION OF FRUIT, VANILLA AND SHERRY.

Aroma: The aroma presents subtle notes of dried fruits and sweet, toasted breads, along with a base toffee, fresh honey and caramelized sugar. You can also appreciate a faint hint of almonds and vanilla.

Taste: Having spent 23 years in the barrel, this rum is as pleasantly complex as the nose and aging would suggest, offering a rich evolution on the mouth – from fresh, sweet sensations to dried fruits.

Finish: Finishing off each decadent sip, you’ll find endnotes that range from a distinct caramel, to sherry, to a well-balanced blend of almond and vanilla.

Where’s that sweetness come from?
Being a traditional Caribbean rum, Kirk and Sweeney is made with sugar cane, which along with some other trade secrets, yields a distinct and subtle sweet, vanilla oak taste.

The rum line
At the beginning of Prohibition, boats could legally stow rum as long as they were three nautical miles off the U.S. coast. In popular smuggling destinations, one could typical see several boats anchored on what became known as the “Rum Line."